Category Archives: SEAHA student research

The ‘SEAHA CDT collection’ in journal Heritage Science

Following multiple successful publications, we are pleased to announce that SEAHA now has its own collection within journal Heritage Science; ‘The SEAHA-CDT collection’.

The SEAHA CDT collection showcases research papers produced by students  studying at our Centre for Doctoral Training, Science and Engineering in Arts, Heritage and Archaeology based at UCL, University of Oxford and University of Brighton.

I see the journal Heritage Science as the ideal venue for our research output: it is interdisciplinary, open to new ideas, and commited to the advancement of heritage science as a scientific discipline

Dr Josep Grau Bove, Guest Editor at Heritage Science

With a wide range of research areas, the collection displays not only the high quality research emerging from the centre but also the diversity of expertise being developed within SEAHA’s cohort. For example, the collection includes work by UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage PhD student Danae Pocobelli who examines using building information modelling (BIM) for heritage buildings. In her article Pocobelli reviews how BIM  has been used in the conservation of historic buildings to date and how aspects of BIM such as condition monitoring and weathering simulation can be used in future.

Another contribution from Hend Mahgoub explores techniques and materials used in Islamic papermaking. Using a variety of chemical analytical methods including surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy, Mahgoub concludes that while there is no single defining characteristic of Islamic paper, 88% contain starch or were polished and the majority were neutral to mildly acidic.

Islamic papers at UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage used by SEAHA student Hend Mahgoub to study the material properties using non-destructive methods

Islamic papers at UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage used by SEAHA student Hend Mahgoub to study the material properties using non-destructive methods

Other contributions to the collection are equally as diverse, on topics such as smells of heritage, imaging Egyptian mummies, and moisture induced damage in the stately home Blickling Hall in Norfolk.

The authors’ backgrounds aranging from pure maths to engineering, to chemistry and sculpture. For instance Carolien Coon, whose research explores the degradation of 3D printed museum objects, has a background in fine art and worked as a sculpture conservator before embarking upon her PhD.

Images of the rapid prototype (RP) artwork “Out of the Cauldron” designed by Tom Lomax produced with RP technologies. Carolien Coon explores the use of RP in heritage in her article as part of the heritage science collection.

Images of the rapid prototype (RP) artwork “Out of the Cauldron” designed by Tom Lomax produced with RP technologies, before (above) and after (below) degradation. Carolien Coon explores the use of RP in heritage in her article as part of the heritage science collection.

Papers for the SEAHA CDT collection are selected by Guest Editor Dr Josep Grau-Bove, who commented on the collection, “I see the journal Heritage Science as the ideal venue for our research output: it is interdisciplinary, open to new ideas, and committed to the advancement of heritage science as a scientific discipline. We hope to continue growing this collection as SEAHA progresses, with at least four new papers a year”. Papers produced by the CDT are invited to be submitted as part of this article collection in Heritage Science.

Explore the SEAHA collection further here.

Cerys Jones winning STEM for Britain poster on multispectral imaging for heritage science on Leonardo de Vinci drawings, with MP Andy Slaughter and fellow poster presenter Anas Imtiaz.

Cerys Jones STEM for Britain poster available online

SEAHA student Cerys Jones‘ poster, which was selected for the STEM for Britain poster competition, is now available online. Cerys’ poster showcases her work imaging three Leonardo de Vinci drawings, housed by the Royal Collection Trust.  Using multispectral imaging, Cerys was able to enhance features not seen to the naked eye revealing how Leonardo built up his drawings and additional sketches within the works that are not normally visible.

Held at the House of Commons, STEM for Britain aims to showcase and support the work of Britain’s early-career researchers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Earlier this year, Cerys presented her poster in front of a panel of judges and members of parliament.

View/download Cerys’ poster here.

Cerys Jones is a SEAHA student based in the Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering at UCL. Supported by R.B. Toth Associates and the London Met Archives, Cerys’ project aims to produce a pipeline for multispectral imaging of documentary material in the heritage sector. 

 


Header Image: MP Andy Slaughter with STEM for Britain presenters Cerys Jones and Anas Imtiaz.

Charlie Willard hyperspectral images 15th century genealogical roll

SEAHA MRes student Charlie Willard recently had the opportunity to image a 15th-century genealogical roll. Held at UCL Special Collections, the roll details the lineage of the Kings of England and draws direct ancestral links between the Plantagenets, legendary King Arthur and even biblical figures such as Adam and Eve.

Six meters long and constructed from eight joined sections of parchment, Charlie captured images of the roll at 400 different wavelengths of light using a hyperspectral camera. A prototype frame was built to allow for translational motion over the roll enabling images to be taken at regular distance intervals. In total, Charlie obtained 50GB of data including calibration data from sixty scans. The next stage is to stitch the images together which will create one large composite image, this can then be processed to see whether the same inks have been used throughout the roll.

Below, Charlie explains how what hyperspectral imaging can show and what he plans to do after:

Charlie’s imaging of the roll feeds directly into his MRes research exploring hyperspectral imaging for large heritage surfaces. Using this case study, Charlie will test and develop image stitching techniques for hyperspectral images which will then progress to new scanning systems at UCL Here East.

See digital images of the roll here.

Charlie Willard is currently a SEAHA MRes student, whose PhD project will be exploring further imaging of heritage surfaces and he will be based in the UCL department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering. He is supported by partners the Camlin Group and the Rijksmuseum

Image: Pixabay.