Tag Archives: featured

Application of new methodology developed from heritage building information modelling to address historic buildings needing maintenance or repair after earthquakes.

Book now: Built Heritage Public Lecture on BIM for earthquake damage

We are pleased to announce that the SEAHA Built Heritage Group and UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage are hosting a public lecture on the 19th September:

ARIM (Assessment Reconstruction Information Modelling): A BIM procedure to prevent and reconstruct earthquakes’ damages – Prof. Tommaso Empler and PhD student Adriana Caldarone, from Sapienza University of Rome.

Book your place here 

Information and Communications Technology (ICT) studies in the Forum of Nerva, Imperial Fora of Rome

Information and Communications Technology (ICT) studies in the Forum of Nerva, Imperial Fora of Rome

Lecture abstract

The Department of History, Representation and Restoration of Architecture, Sapienza University of Rome, with a research unit called “Urban Seismic Risk: Prevention and Reconstruction”, since 2016 is investigating a double BIM (Building Information Modelling) path connected to natural disasters: prevention and reconstruction. The focus is to investigate how small towns (villages) – made up of vernacular buildings – can join a BIM procedure. We are no longer speaking of HBIM (Historic Building Information Modelling), but of ARIM (Assessment Reconstruction Information Modeling). The main topic is linked to “data fusion”, where interdisciplinary skills meet up, ranging from historical sector, to surveying, urban planning, restoration, structures and design. How should data be organised? What are the local regulations? Where – and how – research and the professional world meet each other? These are the topics of a seminar where different cultures and different research fields can be compared to find some common denominators.

The Nervar App, reconstruction of the Imperial Fora of Rome

Speakers

Prof. Tommaso Empler and PhD student Adriana Caldarone work in the Department of History, Representation and Restoration of Architecture (Italian acronym DSDRA) in the Architecture faculty of Sapienza University of Rome. The Department of History, Representation and Restoration of Architecture (Italian acronym DSDRA) was established on July 1, 2010 following a structural reorganisation of “Sapienza University of Rome”. Research objectives of the Department focus on: History of Architecture, including the study of historiographic theories and methods, single historical buildings, cities, smaller towns and landscape; Drawing, including representation methods, the history of representation, the latest architectural and territorial representation and survey techniques, graphics, and design; Restoration, including theories and methods of conservative restoration, the elaboration of conservation and restoration projects, the consolidation of surfaces, and structural consolidation.

Interdisciplinary researches topics are ICT, Seismic Risk, BIM-HBIM-ARIM.

Book your place here.

Header image: the ARIM procedure applied to the town of Grisciano (Accumoli). Grisciano is one of the towns that have been heavily damaged by the 2016 earthquake that hit Central Italy.

The ‘SEAHA CDT collection’ in journal Heritage Science

Following multiple successful publications, we are pleased to announce that SEAHA now has its own collection within journal Heritage Science; ‘The SEAHA-CDT collection’.

The SEAHA CDT collection showcases research papers produced by students  studying at our Centre for Doctoral Training, Science and Engineering in Arts, Heritage and Archaeology based at UCL, University of Oxford and University of Brighton.

I see the journal Heritage Science as the ideal venue for our research output: it is interdisciplinary, open to new ideas, and commited to the advancement of heritage science as a scientific discipline

Dr Josep Grau Bove, Guest Editor at Heritage Science

With a wide range of research areas, the collection displays not only the high quality research emerging from the centre but also the diversity of expertise being developed within SEAHA’s cohort. For example, the collection includes work by UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage PhD student Danae Pocobelli who examines using building information modelling (BIM) for heritage buildings. In her article Pocobelli reviews how BIM  has been used in the conservation of historic buildings to date and how aspects of BIM such as condition monitoring and weathering simulation can be used in future.

Another contribution from Hend Mahgoub explores techniques and materials used in Islamic papermaking. Using a variety of chemical analytical methods including surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy, Mahgoub concludes that while there is no single defining characteristic of Islamic paper, 88% contain starch or were polished and the majority were neutral to mildly acidic.

Islamic papers at UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage used by SEAHA student Hend Mahgoub to study the material properties using non-destructive methods

Islamic papers at UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage used by SEAHA student Hend Mahgoub to study the material properties using non-destructive methods

Other contributions to the collection are equally as diverse, on topics such as smells of heritage, imaging Egyptian mummies, and moisture induced damage in the stately home Blickling Hall in Norfolk.

The authors’ backgrounds aranging from pure maths to engineering, to chemistry and sculpture. For instance Carolien Coon, whose research explores the degradation of 3D printed museum objects, has a background in fine art and worked as a sculpture conservator before embarking upon her PhD.

Images of the rapid prototype (RP) artwork “Out of the Cauldron” designed by Tom Lomax produced with RP technologies. Carolien Coon explores the use of RP in heritage in her article as part of the heritage science collection.

Images of the rapid prototype (RP) artwork “Out of the Cauldron” designed by Tom Lomax produced with RP technologies, before (above) and after (below) degradation. Carolien Coon explores the use of RP in heritage in her article as part of the heritage science collection.

Papers for the SEAHA CDT collection are selected by Guest Editor Dr Josep Grau-Bove, who commented on the collection, “I see the journal Heritage Science as the ideal venue for our research output: it is interdisciplinary, open to new ideas, and committed to the advancement of heritage science as a scientific discipline. We hope to continue growing this collection as SEAHA progresses, with at least four new papers a year”. Papers produced by the CDT are invited to be submitted as part of this article collection in Heritage Science.

Explore the SEAHA collection further here.